Haloperidol decanoate chemical structure

Common adverse effects of Haldol usually include sleepiness, dizziness, rapid heart beat, constipation, excess saliva production and weight gain. Another important adverse effect that occurs commonly is orthostatic hypotension (a lowering of your blood pressure when you are sitting up or standing up). Occasionally this can lead to fainting and falling down, therefore, people taking Haldol should be careful when they change positions. These adverse effects are usually mild and usually go away after the first several days of starting treatment or increasing a dose.

Fluphenazine came into use in 1959. [6] The injectable form is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines , the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system . [7] It is available as a generic medication . [1] In the United States the tablets costs between and USD per day for a typical dose. [1] The wholesale cost in the developing world of the long acting form is between and USD per injection as of 2014. [8] It was discontinued in Australia around mid 2017. [9]

The influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of haloperidol has not been evaluated. About one-third of a haloperidol dose is excreted in urine, mostly as metabolites. Less than 3% of administered haloperidol is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Haloperidol metabolites are not considered to make a significant contribution to its activity, although for the reduced metabolite of haloperidol, back-conversion to haloperidol cannot be fully ruled out. Even though impairment of renal function is not expected to affect haloperidol elimination to a clinically relevant extent, caution is advised in patients with renal impairment, and especially those with severe impairment, due to the long half-life of haloperidol and its reduced metabolite, and the possibility of accumulation (see section ).

The intravenous route is not FDA approved and is generally not recommended except when no other alternatives are available. Intravenous administration appears to be associated with a higher risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP) than other forms of administration. The manufacturer recommends ECG monitoring for QT prolongation and arrhythmias if IV administration is required. A dose in the range of 1 to 5 mg IV has been suggested, with the dose being repeated at 30 to 60 minute intervals, if needed. A maximum IV dose has not been established. The lowest effective dose should be used in conjunction with conversion to oral therapy as soon as possible.

Haloperidol decanoate chemical structure

haloperidol decanoate chemical structure

The intravenous route is not FDA approved and is generally not recommended except when no other alternatives are available. Intravenous administration appears to be associated with a higher risk of QT prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP) than other forms of administration. The manufacturer recommends ECG monitoring for QT prolongation and arrhythmias if IV administration is required. A dose in the range of 1 to 5 mg IV has been suggested, with the dose being repeated at 30 to 60 minute intervals, if needed. A maximum IV dose has not been established. The lowest effective dose should be used in conjunction with conversion to oral therapy as soon as possible.

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