Hcg for low testosterone

There is no scientific evidence that HCG is effective in the treatment of obesity. The meta-analysis found insufficient evidence supporting the claims that HCG is effective in altering fat-distribution, hunger reduction, or in inducing a feeling of well-being. The authors stated “…the use of HCG should be regarded as an inappropriate therapy for weight reduction…” In the authors opinion, “Pharmacists and physicians should be alert on the use of HCG for Simeons therapy. The results of this meta-analysis support a firm standpoint against this improper indication. Restraints on physicians practicing this therapy can be based on our findings.”

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It is suggested that bioavailable testosterone represents the fraction of circulating testosterone that readily enters cells and better reflects the bioactivity of testosterone than does the simple measurement of serum total testosterone. Also, varying levels of SHBG can result in inaccurate measurements of bioavailable testosterone. Decreased SHBG levels can be seen in obesity, hypothyroidism , androgen use, and nephritic syndrome (a form of kidney disease ). Increased levels are seen in cirrhosis , hyperthyroidism , and estrogen use. In these situations, measurement of free testosterone may be more useful.

The blood level of hcG in a woman with an ectopic pregnancy usually rises at a slower rate than normal. Typically, hCG levels double about every two days for the first four weeks of a normal pregnancy, then slow to every 31/2 days by six weeks. Those with failing pregnancies will also frequently have a longer doubling time early on or may even show falling hCG concentrations during the doubling period. hCG concentrations will drop rapidly following a miscarriage. If hCG does not fall to undetectable levels, it may indicate remaining hCG-producing tissue that will need to be removed (dilation and curettage – D&C).

Hcg for low testosterone

hcg for low testosterone

The blood level of hcG in a woman with an ectopic pregnancy usually rises at a slower rate than normal. Typically, hCG levels double about every two days for the first four weeks of a normal pregnancy, then slow to every 31/2 days by six weeks. Those with failing pregnancies will also frequently have a longer doubling time early on or may even show falling hCG concentrations during the doubling period. hCG concentrations will drop rapidly following a miscarriage. If hCG does not fall to undetectable levels, it may indicate remaining hCG-producing tissue that will need to be removed (dilation and curettage – D&C).

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