Testerone in females

While testosterone is typically seen as a "male" hormone, it's also present (albeit in much smaller amounts) in women. However, between 4-7% of American women produce too much testosterone in their ovaries, which usually leads to a condition called polycystic ovary syndrome. [1] Too much testosterone in women can lead to infertility due to lack of ovulation, as well as some embarrassing symptoms like acne, a deepening voice and facial hair growth. Reducing testosterone levels in women is often accomplished with medication, although dietary change can make a positive impact also.

Potential risks and side effects
There is very little clinical research on treating pre-menopausal women. From the small amount of research available, it seems that the androgen levels achieved by treatment, as well as side effects, are the same as those in post-menopausal women. The main untoward effects are acne and facial hair. These occur if the level of testosterone is above normal. However, some sensitive women may have these effects with a level in the normal range. Occasionally fluid retention can occur. If testosterone rises above physiological levels, an abnormal lipid profile may occur. There are no side effects to DHEA itself because there are no receptors in the body for DHEA; all side effects are from the conversion product of DHEA, which is testosterone. Women with a history of breast cancer, severe liver disease, or severe deep vein phlebitis should not take androgens, as a certain amount of testosterone will be converted to estrogen. This treatment is also contraindicated during pregnancy, since testosterones, and even its precursor DHEA, cross the placenta and may cause changes in the genitals of the fetus. Special caution should be used when treating women of childbearing age. When prescribing testosterone treatment to a woman, be sure to prescribe adequate birth control and a warning that the androgen treatment should be stopped immediately if a pregnancy might be even remotely possible, or when considering pregnancy in the near future.

Unlike estrogen, androgen levels don't suddenly drop when you reach natural menopause. Instead, androgen production begins slowly falling in your twenties. By the time you reach menopause, you're producing about half as much as you made at puberty. However, your ovaries may still continue to produce small amounts of androgens even after menopause. Some studies show menopausal ovaries continue to produce testosterone; other studies show they do not. One thing is for sure: if your ovaries are removed or damaged, you will go into surgical or early menopause. Some women who experience surgical menopause report a drop in sexual desire and drive.

Testerone in females

testerone in females

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